Justice Suzanne Côté

Supreme Court of Canada

The Honourable Suzanne Côté was appointed to the Supreme Court of Canada on December 1, 2014. Before her appointment to the Supreme Court of Canada, Justice Côté was a partner at Osler, Hoskin & Harcourt LLP, where she was head of the Montréal office’s litigation group. Before joining Osler, Hoskin & Harcourt, Justice Côté had practised for 23 years at Stikeman Elliott, where she was also head of the Montréal office’s litigation group. She specialized in complex civil and commercial litigation, including cases involving manufacturer’s liability, class actions, shareholder disputes and public law. Before she started working for major law firms, Justice Côté practised for approximately 8 years in the Gaspé Peninsula, where she had been born. Justice Côté received the Advocatus Emeritus distinction from the Barreau du Québec in 2011.  In addition, she has been a Fellow of the American College of Trial Lawyers since 2005.

Legal Reasoning in Constitutional Interpretation: Saturday Keynote Speaker @ 19:00

Marie Henein

 Henein Hutchison LLP

Marie Henein is a senior partner at Henein Hutchison LLP, recognized in Canadian Lawyer as one of the country’s Top Ten Litigation Boutiques. She has been interviewed on CBC’s The National, written for the Globe and Mail, and is a sought after speaker. Named Toronto’s 15th Most Powerful Person by Toronto Life, she has been repeatedly recognized as one of the Top 25 Most Influential Lawyers by Canadian Lawyer and was a recipient of the Laura Legge Award from the Law Society of Upper Canada and the Law Society of Upper Canada Medal. She lives in Toronto with her husband and two children.

How Defence Lawyers Uphold The Rule Of Law: Friday Keynote Speaker @ 19:00

Prof. Ryan Alford

Bora Laskin Faculty of Law – Lakehead University

Ryan Alford is a Professor at the Bora Laskin Faculty of Law, Lakehead University.  He also serves as a Bencher of the Law Society of Ontario, where for the past two years he has been the Vice-Chair of the Tribunal Committee.  He is also an Adjudicator on both the Hearing and Appeal Divisions of the Law Society Tribunal.  His most recent publications include two scholarly monographs on the subject of the rule of law: Seven Absolute Rights and Permanent State of Emergency (McGill-Queens’ University Press, 2020 and 2017).  He has a forthcoming book on the principle of parliamentary sovereignty in Canadian law, tentatively entitled Parliamentary Sovereignty Within Constitutional Supremacy.

Breakout Session 1 – Lessons from the Pandemic: Saturday Panel @ 13:30

Prof. Brian Bird

Peter A. Allard School of Law – University of British Columbia

Brian Bird is an Assistant Professor at the Peter A. Allard School of Law at the University of British Columbia. Before joining Allard Law, Brian was a 2019-2020 John and Daria Barry Postdoctoral Research Fellow at Princeton University in the James Madison Program in American Ideals and Institutions. He also previously clerked for judges of the Supreme Court of British Columbia and for Justice Andromache Karakatsanis at the Supreme Court of Canada. Brian completed his doctorate in law at McGill University and also holds degrees from the University of Oxford, the University of Victoria, and Simon Fraser University.

Emerging Alternatives in Legal Interpretation: Saturday Panel @ 10:45

Prof. Jamie Cameron

Osgoode Hall Law School – York University

Jamie Cameron is Professor Emerita, having retired in January 2020 from Osgoode Hall Law School, where she was on the faculty since 1984. Over the years, she has taught and written on constitutional and public law issues, including the Charter of Rights and Freedoms, freedom of expression and the press, US constitutional law, judicial biography, and criminal law. Her extensive publications include more than twelve edited books. She has appeared at the Supreme Court of Canada on several cases, and most recently in City of Toronto v. Ontario.  She has served on various Boards, including the Canadian Civil Liberties Association, the BC Civil Liberties Association, and Centre for Free Expression. Her cultural boards include Art Canada Institute, the Inuit Art Foundation, and ArtWorks for Cancer. She sits on the Ontario and Nunavut Review Boards, which deal with mentally disordered criminal offenders under Part XX.1 of the Criminal Code.

Dilemmas of Free Expression: Saturday Panel @ 15:00

Prof. Emmett Macfarlane

Department of Political Science – University of Waterloo

Emmett Macfarlane is an associate professor of political science at the University of Waterloo. His research focuses on the intersection of constitutional law, public policy, and governance, with a particular focus on Charter rights, constitutional change, and institutions of government. His most recent books are the edited collection “Dilemmas of Free Expression” (University of Toronto Press, 2022) and “Constitutional Pariah: Reference re Senate Reform and the Future of Parliament” (UBC Press, 2021). He has published in I-CON – The International Journal of Constitutional Law, Supreme Court Law Review, McGill Law Journal, National Journal of Constitutional Law, and the Ottawa Law Review, among other scholarly outlets.

Dilemmas of Free Expression: Saturday Panel @ 15:00

Xavier Foccroulle-Ménard

Norton Rose Fulbright LLP

Xavier Foccroulle Ménard is a banking and finance associate at Norton Rose Fulbright LLP in Montréal. He graduated with a dual common law and civil law degree from the McGill University Faculty of Law and from the University of Toronto Faculty of Law with an LL.M. in legal theory, and was the founding Co-President of the McGill Runnymede Society for three years. He regularly publishes articles on legal theory, natural law as well as banking and finance law. His legal theory in public law work specifically has been and will be published in the BYU Law Review, Anamorphosis, Constitutional Forum for longer articles and in Ius & Iustitium, New Polity, Athwart and the National Post for shorter essays.

Emerging Alternatives in Legal Interpretation: Saturday Panel @ 10:45

Prof. Kerri Froc

Faculty of Law – University of New Brunswick

Kerri A. Froc is an Associate Professor in the Faculty of Law, University of New Brunswick, as well as a Trudeau and Vanier Scholar. She is also the Chair of the National Steering Committee for the National Association of Women and the Law. Dr. Froc received her Ph.D. from Queen’s University (2016), her Master of Laws from the University of Ottawa (2009); her Bachelor of Laws from Osgoode Hall Law School, York University (1996); and her Bachelor of Arts from the University of Regina (1993). Her research interests include theories of constitutional interpretation, access to justice, reproductive rights, rights of political representation, and complex rights violations experienced by working women, poor women and racialized and Indigenous women. Before completing her Ph.D., Dr. Froc spent 18 years as a lawyer, including 10 years working as a staff lawyer for the Canadian Bar Association (CBA). She is a member of the bars of Saskatchewan (1997) and New Brunswick (2019).

Emerging Alternatives in Legal Interpretation: Saturday Panel @ 10:45

Adam Goldenberg

McCarthy Tétrault LLP

Adam Goldenberg is a litigator at McCarthy Tétrault LLP in Toronto. His trial and appellate practice focuses on commercial and regulatory disputes, as well as constitutional litigation. He has represented clients in all manner of proceedings before arbitral tribunals and courts across the country, including in more than a dozen appeals to the Supreme Court of Canada. Adam was lead counsel for the Canadian Constitution Foundation in its successful Charter challenge to the “false statements” prohibition in section 91 of the Canada Elections Act. He is the co-author of Emergency Law in Canada: Commentary & Legislation (LexisNexis Canada, 2021) and the host of McCarthy Tétrault’s award-winning podcast, “Law in the Time of COVID-19”. Born and raised in Vancouver, Adam holds an undergraduate degree from Harvard, received his law degree from Yale, and began his legal career as a law clerk to the judges of the Court of Appeal for Ontario and to Chief Justice Beverley McLachlin at the Supreme Court of Canada.

Breakout Session 1 – Lessons from the Pandemic: Saturday Panel @ 13:30

Prof. Khashayar Haghgouyan

Faculté de droit – Université Laval

Khashayar Haghgouyan est professeur adjoint à la Faculté de droit de l’Université Laval. Il possède une vaste expérience en droit fiscal, ayant conseillé les autorités fiscales fédérale et québécoise  et  les ayant représentées devant toutes les instances judiciaires compétentes, incluant la Cour suprême du Canada. Il a également occupé le poste de directeur de l’interprétation relative aux entreprises au sein de Revenu Québec. Il détient une maîtrise en droit en fiscalité internationale de l’Université de New York, qu’il a fréquentée en tant que boursier Gerald L. Wallace, ainsi qu’une maîtrise en droit en fiscalité de l’Université de Montréal (en affiliation avec HEC Montréal). Il a été admis au Barreau du Québec en 2003.

Breakout Session 2 – Idéologie(s), État de droit et diversité
intellectuelle dans les facultés de droit canadiennes:
Saturday Panel @ 13:30

Asher Honickman

Jordan Honickman Barristers

Asher Honickman is a partner with Jordan Honickman Barristers and president of Advocates for the Rule of Law. He has a diverse practice that includes civil and commercial litigation, defamation, insurance, employment law, personal injury, long term disability, professional misconduct, along with administrative and constitutional law. Asher has appeared at every level of court in Ontario, along with the Supreme Court of Canada. Asher is known for his passionate advocacy inside the courtroom while always taking the time with his clients to ensure that they are comfortable with the litigation process and action plan. In 2020, Asher was the recipient of the prestigious Dan Soberman Outstanding Young Alumni Award (for early-career success) from his alma mater, Queen’s Law. The award recognized that Asher “has become a respected public voice on legal issues.”

Emerging Alternatives in Legal Interpretation: Saturday Panel @ 10:45

Prof. Crik Labelle-Eastaugh

Université de Moncton

Érik Labelle Eastaugh est professeur agrégé et directeur de l’Observatoire international des droits linguistiques à la Faculté de droit de l’Université de Moncton.  Diplômé en droit civil et en common law de l’Université d’Ottawa, il détient également une maîtrise en droit comparé des droits de la personne et un doctorat en droit constitutionnel de l’Université d’Oxford.  Avant d’entamé ses études supérieures, il a été auxiliaire juridique auprès du juge Marshall Rothstein à la Cour suprême du Canada.  Il a plaidé plusieurs dossiers de droit constitutionnel et de droits linguistiques devant les tribunaux, notamment la Cour suprême du Canada.

Breakout Session 2 – Idéologie(s), État de droit et diversité intellectuelle dans les facultés de droit canadiennes: Saturday Panel @ 13:30

Kristopher Kinsinger

Runnymede Society

Kristopher Kinsinger is the national director of the Runnymede Society and the managing editor of The A.V. Dicey Law Review. Kristopher received his JD from Osgoode Hall Law School in 2019, where he was the recipient of several scholarships and prizes, before completing his articles of clerkship with a national law firm in Waterloo, Ontario. He was called to the Ontario Bar in 2020, and received his LLM from McGill University in 2021 on a Joseph Armand Bombardier Canada Graduate Scholarship and with the Pilarczyk Graduate Award in Law. Kristopher’s research is focussed on fundamental freedoms, constitutional architecture, and Canadian legal history. His writing has appeared in periodicals such as The Supreme Court Law Review, Constitutional Forum, and the National Post. Kristopher currently serves on the board of directors of Christian Legal Fellowship and as an officer with the Canadian Bar Association’s Constitutional and Human Rights Section.

The History and Future of the Notwithstanding Clause: Saturday Panel @ 9:00

Prof. Carissima Mathen

Faculty of Law – University of Ottawa

Carissima Mathen is Professor of Law at the University of Ottawa.  A leading constitutional scholar, she is the author of The Tenth Justice (UBC Press) and Courts Without Cases: The Law and Politics of Advisory Opinions (Hart).  In 2021, Courts Without Cases received 2nd Place Distinction in the prestigious Walter Owen Book Competition.  As a former Director of Litigation for the Women’s Legal Education and Action Fund (LEAF), Professor Mathen undertook path-breaking equality rights litigation before the Supreme Court of Canada.  An award-winning media commentator and Ontario Law Society medallist, Professor Mathen is committed to public education and legal literacy.  In addition to her books, Professor Mathen has published on all aspects of constitutional law; as well as in criminal law, legal theory, and law and technology.

Dilemmas of Free Expression: Saturday Panel @ 15:00

Prof. Dwight Newman

College of Law – University of Saskatchewan

Dwight Newman, QC, BA (Economics), JD, BCL, MPhil, DPhil is a Professor of Law and Canada Research Chair in Indigenous Rights in Constitutional and International Law at the University of Saskatchewan.  Following law school, he clerked for Chief Justice Lamer and Justice LeBel at the Supreme Court of Canada, worked for human rights NGOs in South Africa and Hong Kong and for Justice Canada in Ottawa, and completed his graduate studies at Oxford as a Rhodes Scholar.  Since joining the University of Saskatchewan faculty in 2005, he has published widely on constitutional law issues, Indigenous rights issues, and intersections of these areas with natural resource issues.  Along with a hundred articles or book chapters, he has published a dozen books, including two books on the duty to consult that have been widely cited in judicial decisions and the co-authored Law of the Canadian Constitution (2nd edn published in 2017), which have been widely cited in judicial decisions.  He has provided selective legal advice to a variety of clients on constitutional law issues, and he has done consulting work for international investors in Canada’s natural resource sector.  He pursued additional studies during COVID, and he has recently completed requirements for an MATS in History of Christianity and an MSc in Finance and Financial Law.

The History and Future of the Notwithstanding Clause: Saturday Panel @ 9:00

Patricia Paradis

Centre for Constitutional Studies – University of Alberta

Patricia Paradis, (LLB, M.Ed. CMed.), is the Executive Director of the Centre for Constitutional Studies at the University of Alberta. Patricia has had a lengthy career as a human rights educator and advisor – she taught “Human Rights Law in Canada” as a sessional instructor in the Faculty for 23 years and was nominated for three Excellence in Teaching Awards.. Prior to joining the Centre ibn 2010, she founded Paradis & Associates, a dispute resolution practice, where she worked in mediation and facilitation for 10 years. Patricia has served as the Chair or Board Director on several boards, notably as National Chair of the Women’s Legal Education and Action Fund (LEAF)  from 1995-1999. She is currently National Chair of the Canadian Bar Association (CBA) Dispute Resolution Section Executive, Past Chair of the CBA Constitutional and Human Rights Section Executive, and a Board Director with the Parkland Institute, and the Alberta Civil Liberties Research Centre. She is a recipient of a Women in Law Leadership (WILL) Award (2018) for her work in the community as well as a  LifeTime Achievement Award from LEAF (2010).

 

The History and Future of the Notwithstanding Clause: Saturday Panel @ 9:00

Derek Ross

Christian Legal Fellowship (CLF)

Derek is the Executive Director & General Counsel for Christian Legal Fellowship, where he oversees all aspects of the organization’s operations, education and training programs, publications, and advocacy. HHis litigation practice focuses on human rights and religious freedom, and he has acted for public interest interveners in a number of cases involving the Charter of Rights and Freedoms, including before the Supreme Court of Canada. He has also appeared before legislative and Parliamentary committees to present on constitutional and legal issues. His writings have appeared in a number of publications, including The Supreme Court Law Review, The Globe and Mail, The Lawyer’s Daily, Canadian Lawyer, Policy Options, and Public Discourse.

 

The History and Future of the Notwithstanding Clause: Saturday Panel @ 9:00

Prof. Stéphane Sérafin

Faculty of Law – University of Ottawa

Stéphane Sérafin is an Assistant Professor at the Common Law Section of the University of Ottawa, Faculty of Law. He is a member of the Law Society of Ontario and the Barreau du Québec and holds a Master of Laws from the University of Toronto. Professor Sérafin’s research focuses mainly on private law theory, with a particular emphasis on the common law tradition. He has also writes on legal interpretation and general jurisprudence.

 

Breakout Session 2 – Idéologie(s), État de droit et diversité intellectuelle dans les facultés de droit canadiennes: Saturday Panel @ 13:30

Prof. Leonid Sirota

Faculty of Law – University of Ottawa

Leonid Sirota is Associate Professor at the Reading Law School, in the United Kingdom. He is a graduate of McGill and NYU and clerked at the Federal Court of Canada; he also taught in New Zealand. His research is concerned with Canadian and comparative public law, as well as legal philosophy. He is also the creator and co-author of the Double Aspect blog.

 

Dilemmas of Free Expression: Saturday Panel @ 15:00

Prof. Maxime St-Hilaire

Faculté de droit – Université de Sherbrooke

Titulaire d’un doctorat en droit (LLD) de l’Université Laval, Maxime St-Hilaire est professeur agrégé à la faculté de droit de l’Université de Sherbrooke, où il enseigne le droit constitutionnel et la philosophie du droit. En 2021, il a remporté, pour son livre sur Les Positivismes juridiques au XXe siècle. Normativismes, sociologismes, réalismes (PUL, 2020) et dans la catégorie des lettres et sciences humaines, le prix de la recherche et de la création que remet annuellement cette dernière université. En 2014, il avait remporté le prix Minerve pour son ouvrage sur La lutte pour la pleine reconnaissance des droits ancestraux: problématique juridique et enquête philosophique (Yvon Blais, 2015), qui consistait en la publication de la thèse de doctorat et s’inscrivait dans le prolongement de ses travaux sur le philosophe allemand Axel Honneth, qui l’avaient vu coordonner la publication d’un dossier sur « Axel Honneth et le droit » dans la revue Droit et Société (2011/2). Avec Me Joanna Baron, il a dans l’intervalle dirigé la publication d’Attacks on the Rule of Law from Within (Lexis/SCLR, 2019). Le professeur St-Hilaire est l’auteur de plus de 35 articles et chapitres et d’une soixantaine de communications. Il a séjourné dans plusieurs centres de recherche et institutions universitaires, dont le Centre Marc Bloch, le Norwegian Centre for Human Rights, le Louvain Global College of Law et l’École de droit de SciencePo Paris. Durant sa formation doctorale, il fut auxiliaire juridique de l’hon. Marie Deschamps J., à la Cour suprême du Canada (2009-2010), après avoir été stagiaire de la Commission de Venise (2007-2008).

 

Breakout Session 2 – Idéologie(s), État de droit et diversité intellectuelle dans les facultés de droit canadiennes: Saturday Panel @ 13:30

Kerry Sun

Sullivan & Cromwell LLP

Kerry Sun is an associate in the New York office of Sullivan & Cromwell LLP. After graduating from the University of Toronto, where he was founding Co-President of the Runnymede Society chapter, he served as a law clerk at the Court of Appeal of Alberta and to Justice Sheilah L. Martin at the Supreme Court of Canada. His work has been published in Queen’s Law JournalDalhousie Journal of Legal StudiesConstitutional ForumIus & Iustitium, and the National Post.

Emerging Alternatives in Legal Interpretation: Saturday Panel @ 10:45

Prof. Régine Tremblay

Peter A. Allard School of Law – University of British Columbia

Régine Tremblay est professeure adjointe à la Peter A. Allard School of Law depuis 2017 et directrice du Centre for Feminist Legal Studies (University of British Columbia). Elle détient un doctorat (S.J.D.) et une maîtrise (LL.M.) en droit de l’Université de Toronto, ainsi qu’un double baccalauréat en droit de l’Université McGill (B.C.L. & LL.B.). Elle est membre du Barreau du Québec. Elle est coauteure de la deuxième édition du Dictionnaire de droit privé et lexiques bilingues : Les familles, (2016), coédirectrice de l’ouvrage Les intraduisibles en droit civil (2014) et de House Rules Changing Families, Evolving Norms, and the Role of the Law (2022). Ses recherches et enseignements portent sur le droit de la famille, les technologies de la reproduction, la médiation familiale, le droit privé, le droit comparé, la réforme du droit et les approches critiques.

Breakout Session 2 – Idéologie(s), État de droit et diversité intellectuelle dans les facultés de droit canadiennes: Saturday Panel @ 13:30

Christine Van Geyn

Canadian Constitution Foundation

Christine Van Geyn is an outspoken advocate for freedom in Canada and was appointed the CCF Director of Litigation in 2020. Christine earned her undergraduate degree in Political Science and Ethics, Society and Law at the University of Toronto, Trinity College. She earned her JD at Osgoode Hall Law school, and also studied at New York University School of Law. She was called to the bar in Ontario in 2012. Before joining CCF, Christine practiced commercial litigation, and then was the Ontario Director of a not for profit organization, where she was involved in several high profile constitutional challenges. Christine is also the host of the national broadcast television program, Canadian Justice, which discusses the country’s most important legal cases and issues.

 

Breakout Session 1 – Lessons from the Pandemic: Saturday Panel @ 13:30

 

Prof. Lorraine Weinrib

Faculty of Law – University of Toronto

Lorraine E. Weinrib, J.D. (U of T) and LLM (Yale). Counsel, Ministry of the Attorney General of Ontario, 1975-88, rising to the position of Deputy Director of Constitutional Law & Policy. Represented Ontario in Ford (1988), the leading SCC case on Charter s. 33. Professor of law at U of T since 1988, teaching Canadian constitutional law, comparative constitutional law, and constitutional litigation and advocacy. Approach to the Charter emphasizes the legitimacy of the novel institutional roles it established, based on its historical and political genesis, transformative aspirations, and the theoretical and comparative models it embodies and rejects.  Publications include “Learning to Live with the Override”, McGill LJ 1989-90 and “The Canadian Charter’s Override: Lessons for Israel”, Israel Law Review 2016.

 

The History and Future of the Notwithstanding Clause: Saturday Panel @ 9:00

 

Cara Zwibel

Canadain Civil Liberties Assocaition (CCLA)

Cara Zwibel is Director of the Fundamental Freedoms Program and Interim General Counsel at the Canadian Civil Liberties Association (CCLA). Her work at the CCLA involves working with outside counsel on litigation, representing the organization in court, making submissions to legislative committees and other public bodies, and engaging in media work and public legal education. Prior to joining CCLA, Cara worked at a large national law firm and clerked for the Honourable Justice Ian Binnie at the Supreme Court of Canada. She has a Political Science degree from McGill University, an LL.B. from Osgoode Hall, and an LL.M. from New York University. 

 

Breakout Session 1 – Lessons from the Pandemic: Saturday Panel @ 13:30

 

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